Morphophysiology of the green - turtle salt gland cheloniamydas (Linnaeus, 1758) / Morfofisiologia da glândula de sal de tartaruga verde cheloniamydas (Linnaeus, 1758)

Luana Félix de Melo, Marisol León Cabrera, Ana Clara Bastos Rodrigues, Anaelise de Oliveira Macedo Turquetti, Adriano Ferreira da Silva, André Luis Rezende Franciolli, Edris Queiroz Lopes, Rose Eli Grassi Rici

Resumo


In the group of reptiles there are many marine species whose foods have high concentration of salts getting with the blood plasma very concentrated. Turtles, lizards and sea birds have salt glands that, through active transport, excrete excess ingested salt. The objective of this study was to describe the morphology of green - turtle salt glands (Cheloniamydas). The salt gland was removed and analyzed macroscopically and microscopically by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Macroscopically, the salt glands are paired in the hind laterally region of the eyes, with a reddish-brown color and lobulated appearance. In the most apical region of the gland its shape is concave adhered to the eye and in the basal region is triangular. Microscopically it was observed that the lobes are separated by blood vessels and connective tissue. The glands have simple tubular glandular tissue that emerge into a central duct. Morphological findings suggest that this gland helps blood osmoregulation by aiding renal function, where excess salt is transported into the cells via osmosis, which in turn releases via exocytosis, into the canalicular lumen.


Palavras-chave


In the group of reptiles there are many marine species whose foods have high concentration of salts getting with the blood plasma very concentrated. Turtles, lizards and sea birds have salt glands that, through active transport, excrete excess ingested sa

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.34188/bjaerv3n2-032

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